Interesting Height Statistics

Statistics can often be used to find stories that would otherwise not be known or told. We can often guess or speculate about things, but statistics are usually the irrefutable proof that proves or disproves them one way or the other. Height has incredibly interesting statistics that may answer many questions about us as a people, and about our past, present, and future.

1) Height by Region – This is probably the one area that has been most speculated over for ages. Why are people in some regions of the world so much taller on average than those from other regions? For example, the average male in the Netherlands stands six feet tall, while the average Japanese male is just five feet five.

Through study of such statistics, we’ve discovered some of the reasons why we believe some people are generally taller than others, though many mysteries remain. Nutrition and genetics of course play a role, but beyond that it’s also a well established fact that wealth also comes into play (though that would probably tie in with nutrition).





2) Growth Spurts – Even parents who are prepared for their children’s growth spurts are often caught by surprise at how truly dramatic the sudden growth is. For females, they hit their spurt around 10 or 11, and will grow up to 3.5 inches per year. Males, who hit their spurt slightly later than females, can grow up to 4.5 inches per year.

3) Family Ties – We talked about genetics earlier, and the subject of height and genetics has been analyzed so much that a formula for predicting height based on genetics has become widespread.

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The formula works like this. Take the height of your 6 immediate ancestors, two parents and four grandparents, and add them together in inches, then divide that number by 6. From that number, males should multiple by 1.08 and add 3.5 inches, while females should multiple by 0.92 and add 2.5 inches.

4) Height in the Workplace – An interesting statistic shows that taller men are selected for employment positions or promotions three times more often than their shorter counterparts, when it’s determined their skills are equal.

5) Height in Love – Finally, there’s also a definite connection between height and romance. Women specifically tend to desire taller men more so than men do of women. Women who described themselves as physical fit or athletic were much less likely to want a shorter man, while larger women, who conceivably would have fewer options were more willing to date a short man.

By region and race, Asian women are the most forgiving of small statures, partially as a result of their own small frames. Black women, generally the tallest women in the world, were also the most demanding of their partners being tall.

These are just some of the many fascinating statistics that surround height, in our culture, our workplace, and even our bedrooms.